Posted by: Dr. Y. | November 2, 2018

Tourism in Africa: The Difficulty for Africans to obtain Visas in Africa to Visit African Countries

THE-MOST-POWERFUL-AFRICAN-PASSPORTS-TO-HAVE-GHANA-MEDIA-WORLD

Some African passports

Traveling in Africa is not easy, particularly for Africans. Yes… you read it well: it is difficult to travel within Africa if you are African! Why is that, you might ask? Because as African, you will need a visa to almost all the countries on the continent! Not only are the visa fees colossal, but the time to wait for some of these are pretty long, the long lines, the information for the visa changes almost every month (South Africa, I am looking at you) but also there are not that many airlines servicing those countries, especially after the now defunct Air Afrique went bust. Nowadays Ethiopian Airlines, Asky Airlines, RwandAir, Kenya Airways and others are ramping up to help with these, but it is not easy.

Dangote

Aliko Dangote

Imagine that as a citizen of African country X, I need a visa to visit almost all countries on the continent (except those in the same economic region as mine), and those visa fees are pretty hefty. On top of that, I need a visa to visit all other countries in the world as well. Africa’s richest man, Aliko Dangote, a Nigerian (better passport than mine), expressed the same frustration as mine when he said in 2016, that he needed 38 visas to travel within the continent, while European nationals just waltz into most African countries without visa! How fair is that? And talk about the service at some of those consulates? Or the cost of sending your documents or traveling to a neighboring country because there is no diplomatic representation in yours just to apply for a visa! Moreover, even though you are paying for these visas, and it will benefit the visited country, some of these consulate representatives act as if you were asking them for a favor.

1000 FCFA (BCEAO)

1000 FCFA (BCEAO)

It also costs more to fly to many of these neighboring African countries from within Africa, than to fly to Europe, or Asia, or even America from Africa. It is as if, the contact with other Africans was purposely discouraged so as to make sure that Africans never unite, never learn from past mistakes, remain secluded, and never trade with each other (this, in addition to that slave currency FCFA: France’s Colonial Tax on Africa). For indeed, what could justify that it costs more to fly to Liberia from Ghana than to fly to the UK from Ghana, but a clear wish to stop Liberians from communicating with Ghanaians and realizing that they could trade with each other, instead of the Europeans who are farther away. O Africans, when are you going to wake up and be in charge of your destiny?


Responses

  1. ” O Africans, when are you going to wake up and be in charge of your destiny?”

    Never, would be my guess which is also more than likely, a fact, hence the reason why I am sitting in Amerikkka speaking English instead of in Africa speaking a dialect that is native to some African country. If after all these centuries, Africa still has not gotten its collective act together, than it never will. I don’t wonder any more why those of us who are the descendants of Africa’s stolen people have not been welcomed to ANY African country. This post helps explain why.

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    • That is sad that you think that way Shelby, and that indeed is what the white patriarchal system has succeeded in doing, as I said at the end of the article: dividing us: making those in the diaspora, those who were taken centuries ago think that they are better, and sometimes superior to those on the continent or dissasociate with those on the continent, when in reality it is not true.
      The white media only shows images of extreme poverty or war on the African continent, which also only applies to a few countries.
      Africans in general are very welcoming to foreigners (a bit too much in my opinion).
      The article highlights the fact that this division of the continent helps only the external forces.
      The AU recently created a passport to help with those difficulties, but it has not yet been implemented or is waiting to arrive.

      Like

  2. I am surprised at this news.

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  3. I am very appreciative of this article. I am planning to travel to Africa soon and this gives me something to think about in my planning stages. Thank you

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    • Glad this could help. If I may ask what countries are you planning to visit?

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      • I am still trying to figure that out, lol. This past year, my husband and I have begun a journey to reconnect to the motherland and all we really want to do is go and experience the motherland because we eventually will be moving there in the next 2 to 3 years.

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      • Beautiful! I wish you a great time, and good luck in all your endeavors.

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  4. Thank you

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  5. Its a question of leadership. African regional blocs,be it ECOWAS, SADC, ECA etc have no understanding of the benefits of movement of people. Poor leaderships and corruption have drained government coffers dry. These leaders see VISA costs as means to add to the national fiscus. Its a quick get rich scheme for them. Secondly, for Visas to be scrapped, we need to think beyond immigration. Our leaders do not see the incentives of removing such barriers and noone is there to explain the issues.

    The continent is also war torn and it wouldd be a huge risk if you allowed people to walk into countries without checks and balances. With the sudden rise of terrorism, i dont see Visas going anywhere anytime soon. They are a deterrent in some form or another….

    Like


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